For five years, San Marcos city officials kept from public view a color-coded map showing varying degrees of risk to residents from catastrophic wildfires ---- including two neighborhoods judged to be in "extreme" danger of property loss, death or injury ---- for fear insurance companies would use the information to justify dropping policies or hiking rates, officials have acknowledged.

In 2005, San Marcos commissioned a study to assess wildfire risks for the city's communities. The study rated two communities as having "extreme" and five as having "very high" risks during wildfires.

City officials said in a series of recent interviews that they decided not to publicly release a color-coded map from the study that marked Coronado Hills and neighboring Attebury in a shade of deep red ---- signifying extreme wildfire hazard ---- opting instead to circulate a version showing all wildfire areas in a uniform shade of green.

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Inspirational Quotes

You can turn painful situations around through laughter. If you can find humor in anything, even poverty, you can survive it.


I attended Saturday, Sunday and Wednesday partial loss only session. Each of the meetings I learned something very useful by your presentation and by the interaction from other attendees. Your looking out for our welfare is a blessing and God sent. You already know that what we are going through is harder than any of us realize since you have experienced this yourselves and helped in many catastrophes. Your looking out for our welfare is a blessing and God sent. I want to personally thank you and CARe for what you do. Your heartfelt compassion and teaching what matters to people that have been in harms way is a cause that touches many and gives hope in a world that is so full of anything but care and compassion.

Waldo Canyon Fire Survivor, 2012